Giving Thanks on Thanksgiving

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

READ THIS

Today is Thanksgiving in the US – and while only about half of you in the LIving Contentmeht community are in the US – I still think it’s a good opportunity for all of us to pause and reflect on the things we have to be thankful for.

Thankfulness is one of the great disciplines that helps bring about a life of contentment.

1 Chronicles 16:34
Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; his love endures forever.

We have been given so much – it only makes sense for us to appreciate what we have. And we can only show appreciation TO someone (or something) so we thank God.

1 Thes 5:18
give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

And a contented person cannot only be thankful when things are going well -but in all situations.

Phil 4:6
Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

It’s something we have to work on – to keep on focusing on – not letting ourselves fall back into a life of thanklessness.

Col 4:2
Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

DO THIS

Grab a piece of paper – or open a new document on your phone, etc – and just start numbering things you are thankful for.

Start with the big – include the small. Physical, emotional, visible, and intangible. People, experiences, whatever.

Just keep going….. write them all down.

keep the document – and the next time you feel like things aren’t going so well–grab it and remind yourself of what you have to be thankful for.

PRAY THIS

Let us remember that we are in the holy presence of God.
Loving Creator,
We asked for strength, and you gave us difficulties to make us strong.
We asked for wisdom, and you gave us problems to solve.
We asked for prosperity, and you gave us purpose and brains to use.
We asked for courage, and you gave us fears to overcome.
We asked for patience, and you gave us situations where we were forced to wait.
We asked for love, and you gave us troubled people to help.
We asked for justice, and you called us to be just and to lead with integrity.
Lord, we have received nothing that we asked for or wanted.
And yet, we received everything that we needed.
For this, we give thanks.

– Dr. Colleen Hanycz upon her selection as President of Xavier University

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

This week it hit me….

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

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I’ve been sharing these weekly nudges toward Biblical contentment for almost three years now. I’ve been writing on, thinking about, and wrestling with contentment for years before that. However, this past Sunday I was giving the message at our service here, concluding our series on the book of Philippians, and the beauty, and simplicity, and difficulty of Biblical contentment hit me in a new way.

The passage I was assigned was the last half of the last chapter. This includes what (in my opinion) is the most direct, blatant, and powerful passage on true Biblical contentment, Philippians 4:10-13:

I rejoiced greatly in the Lord that at last you renewed your concern for me. Indeed, you were concerned, but you had no opportunity to show it. I am not saying this because I am in need, for I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances. I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do all this through him who gives me strength.

The beauty of it – is that it doesn’t depend on us – it’s Christ’s power working, in, through, and despite us.

I can do all this through him who gives me strength.

The simplicity of it is – we can’t rely on our circumstances for our contentment.

The difficulty of it is – we can’t rely on our circumstances for our contentment.

What hit me however was the ‘even if’ nature of Paul here. Like Joseph when his brothers betray him, and Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. They were’nt scared by “what if this bad thing happens.”

Rather, they lived in the security of “I know God can save me….but EVEN IF he doesn’t – he is still God.”

DO THIS

What is the one big thing that you are dreading right now? That thing that if it happens, you have no idea how things will go on? That ruling that could sink your company, that diagnosis that will destroy your family, that decision that could ruin your career? That thing you would most fear if you put it in the phrase:

What if ______?

Now, take that same thing – whatever it is – and replace the what if with the words even if _____ God is still God.

Then drill down further and further again until you are left with nothing but the goodness of God

For example:

What if the doctor calls back and the test is positive?

Even if the doctor calls back an the test is positive – I’ll still be able to do my job, it will just be harder.
Even if I can’t still do my job – we can live off our savings for a while.
Even if we can’t live off savings – we have extended family who will help out.
Even if family can’t help – we still have each other.
Even if we don’t have each other – God is still God. He is still good. He is still in control

I think this helps us to see two things:

  1. that thing we’re scared of may not be as bad as we think
  2. no matter what happens, God is still God.

PRAY THIS

God, give me the faith of Job
realizing we came into this world with nothing,
we leave it with nothing,
and in the middle you sometimes give,
and take away.
Give me the faith of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego
knowing that you are powerful enough to save us,
BUT EVEN IF YOU DO NOT.
You are still God.
Amen

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Encourage Each other through the storm….

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

READ THIS

Several weeks ago I asked you – the Living Contentment community – if there were ways God has helped you through difficult times. Here are three of the responses that speak of God coming alongside, walking with, and delivering other members of this community through the storms of life.

Read these three stories. In some ways they couldn’t be more different – but they also speak of the same God, extending grace, comfort, and perhaps more than anything – contentment in the midst of life’s struggles.

From almost my own funeral – to a wedding.

Have been studying Philippians … brought out responses to suffering and the context of faith/worry being 1. pray (be in relational communication with God), 2. meditate on the word (remember truth) and 3. look back on God’s past faithfulness (remember the story) – that important communal aspect of repeating the story. Since I was in an ICU two years ago with a trauma score that had a 50-50 survival chance, and I’m now typing an email about to go to a wedding of a student we’ve sponsored for much of his life in Uganda . . . why do I forget the rescues so easily.

God allowed suffering – to equip me to serve

As a young adult, I found myself addicted to alcohol and marijuana, and experiencing PTSD symptoms from physical and sexual abuse during childhood that I had not yet learned to name or understand. I was also a card-carrying secular humanist with no time or tolerance for God or those who followed him. Within those storms of life, I was brought to the end of myself in such a manner as to become humbly willing to cry out to God for rescue, from both temporal destruction and eternal condemnation. Long story short, these 39-years later, I’ve been set free from those bondages, and equipped to serve others as a trauma and addictions counselor, to pay forward that with which God has blessed me. 2 Corinthians 1:3-4 puts it well, for anyone God has brought through any storms; “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.”

Sickness and sorrow – cannot take away joy


God has been very good for me in the past 2 years. In Jan of 2021 I was diagnosed with Kidney Cancer and had a kidney removed in the US. I stayed with my sister. I went back to the US in August of 2021 for a follow-up appointment after I retired on July 25. I started a road trip to the US on July 26. I was very sure that they had got the cancer and I was just doing a routine follow-up. However, that was not the case. They discovered that I had cancer in my bladder and it had spread into the muscle tissue around the bladder so I was going to need to have my bladder removed. They sent me to Indianapolis where that surgery took place last September. Because I had a kidney removed already my kidney function was not sufficient to tolerate chemo treatments, but they decided to do immunotherapy treatments over the course of the year. I’ve been living with my sister and brother-in-law for over a year. On September 14. I had my final CAT scan report and it looked pretty good except for spots on my lungs that are too small to biopsy. On September 21 I went to Indianapolis for a follow-up with my surgeon and left from there to resume my road trip. In the past week, I’ve been able to see a lot of neat sites, visit with friends in Colorado and hit some national monuments and parks along the way. God has been so good and helping me stay sane and return to being healthy again. I was quite content during the past year (except when I was worrying about my kids ). But even through that, problems were easily resolved with prayer and help from friends.

DO THIS

Think about your own life – what stories can you share to encourage others with how God has come alongside you, walked with you, and delivered you?

THese stories are powerful testimonies to who God is, what he does, and how he saves.

PRAY THIS

Deliverer,
healer, comforter, savior,
Thank you for how you’ve saved me –
in so many ways from so many things.
Give me courage, and opportunity,
to share these stories of your rescue with others,
so they may understand your heart better.
Amen.

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Push you towards Contentment

Hi Reader,

A few weeks ago i sent out a list of five biographies of people who had lived through some really tough things but found God’s contentment in the middle of it all.

A few weeks before that I shared a list of five books that have really shaped how I understood Biblical Contentment.

Today i have a list of five books that have pushed me along into contentment. Not just examples of it, or understanding it, but helping me actually live it.

These are works that helped me see – sometimes in quite practical ways – how to find God’s contentment despite the hardships of life.

Four Books that Pushed Me Into a Life of Contentment:

(in no particular order)

1. Praying Like Monks, Living Like Fools – Tyler Staton

This book was a wake up call for me. Staton is a normal guy, with a normal life – that’s not really normal because of his reliance on prayer. He shares his experience in fully relying on God through prayer. Not that God will give you what you want – but through prayer you reshape your life – into one of more contentment as you become more reliant on God

2. Ruthless Elimination of hurry – John Mark Comer

This book feels like something that I will need to reread every year or so. So much of our hurry is due to feeling we are responsible for everythign. We think if we don’t get everything done that we think we need to, the world falls apart. Comer argues hurry is the great enemy of a spiritual life. Hurry is us being distracted from what we ought to be paying attention to….God. The solution he argues is actually admitting we have limitations, and accept Jesus easy yoke. The book has some good practical insight into the ancient spiritual disciplines: silence and solitude, sabbath, True contentment is found when we admit we can’t do everything and instead rely on God to guide our path.

3. You Are What You Love – James KA Smith

Caveat- I love James KA Smith’s writing (I just finished How to inhabit Time) – second caveat Smith is a philosophy professor so his books are not always ”easy reads.” The main premise is: You are what you love. But you might not love what you think. Smith pushes us to think about what we really love – if we look at what we spend our time, energy, resources on. THOSE are the things we really worship – and they change who we are. We often want to shape our culture but ignore how the love’s of culture are shaping us. The subtitle of the book is “The Spiritual Power of Habit” as Smith urges us to see that it doesn’t really matter what we ‘think’ or what we ‘believe’ if what we do -which shows the true direction of our loves – is not aligned . He emphasized spiritual ‘formation’ not merely ‘information as the way to find lasting contentment.

4. The Next right thing – Emily P. Freeman

I remember reading Freema’s The Next Right Thing years ago when I was in a time of trying to figure out what direction our lives might take. One thing that really stuck out for me was realizing that in so many decisions i was always looking to the potential end-result, and trying to manage that. Freeman argues if we have faith that God is in control. we leave results up to him, and merely do what we think is the next right thing. When we realize we are often scared about making ‘the wrong choice’ – no matter how big or small – we realize how much fear is controlling us. Admitting we never had control is the only way to get over that fear and find lasting contentment in life despite all the many decisions we face – big and small – every day.

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Good reminder……horrible comparison

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

READ THIS

Wednesday afternoons I take a group of students over to the hospital in our town. Usually we spend our time going from room to room visiting patients in the pediatric ward. We sit and talk to the kids and their parents, listen to their stories, pray for them, and try to just be present with them. This week there was a pretty sad case. A young boy named Simeon – honestly hard to tell his age because of how skinny he was. He had a massive tumor hanging off his face, his eyes were glassy, skin faded. His parents were with him in a room -but there was no IV, no monitors, no oxygen – like you would imagine for a child so sick. He was dying of cancer, and there was nothing more that could be done.

For quite a while (and still…obviously) I couldn’t get the image out of my head. It prompted me to continue to pray for him, and to be thankful for what I have, as my life doesn’t have that kind of pain and sorrow. Reminding myself of how content I should be.

But then I had to stop myself.

Why am I basing my contentment on comparison?

Sure I could look at what his parents appear to be living through, and the problems I deal with and think “well….at least my life isn’t THAT hard.”

But that’s not contentment. Because as long as I’m comparing to something else – it can chance in a heart beat. That’s being happy with my current situation – not being content with whatever life gives me.

If that’s what I base my contentment on – what if I turn around and find someone whose life appears way easier and more pleasant than mine? Then what?

What if I were Simeon’s father? Should I then NOT be content because everyone else I see appears to be better off?

Seeing others can be a good reminder to be thankful for what we have. I think it’s healthy to be reminded to say “God – thank you so much for the health of my kids. Thank you that I’ve not had to deal with the pain of losing a child. God thanks for the medical care we’ve had access to. Thank you for the gift of healing you have given us when we’ve become sick.”

I think that’s a good reminder

But it’s a horrible comparison.

DO THIS

So often when we compare ourselves to others we pick someone who appears to be doing better than us. A life that appears easier, happier, more fun… But think of someone who you know is having a hard time right now.

Now – instead of thinking you should be content with your life simply because “you don’t have it that bad” pray two things:

1) for that person. That they would know God’s presence, love, acceptance, and mercy

2) thankfulness for what you have. Not that “at least my life isn’t THAT hard” but for the good things you often neglect. The things you assume you’ll have. The goodness that you take for granted.

PRAY THIS

God of mercy,
be with those who are suffering.
Help them find contentment in you alone.
Make us all mindful of what you have given us.
Help us see your goodness all around us.
Remind us we are not in competition for your love,
but that you spread it around unendingly.
Amen.

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Encourage each other through the storm…

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

READ THIS

Last week we looked at how the storms of life are not a sign that God has left you, but maybe what will bring you closer to him.

The last few days have felt like there have been a lot of storms hitting people around us.
Sudden life-altering medical diagnosis.
Unforeseen injuries.
Struggles that
just
won’t
stop.

But I realized in the midst of all this there is always hope – at least for those who weather the storm on a solid foundation.

Sharing those stories of hope is an encouragement to the rest of us.

Sometimes we need to be reminded that we are not alone in our struggles. Sometimes we need to remember there is a community seeking God’s living contentment.
Often we need to be told of the ways God has stepped into the lives of others. Stories of rescue and healing.
But also stories of presence and peace in the midst of tragedy and loss.

Contentment is going to stay far off when we convince ourselves we are the only ones in a storm. Discontentment is the result of thinking this particular storm we are in – is hopeless.

So….Living Contentment community….let’s come together

DO THIS

HIT REPLY, and let me know a specific way God has seen you through a difficult time.

How have you seen God step into the middle of a storm to get you?

Where has the solid foundation of Christ supported you through something that seemed impossible to survive?

When have you experienced a Peace that truly exceeds all human understanding, when you were able to live contently in the middle of a storm?


I’ll collect these stories and share them (anonymously) with all of you in the Living Contentment community next week.

(make sure you let me know if you DON’T want your story shared)

PRAY THIS

God of Peace,
You have made us for you
and made us for community.
Help us to encourage each other,
as we retell of your power, love, mercy, and grace.
Remind us of your consistent, loving presence in our lives.
Thank you for how you rescue us from the storm,
and for the times when you sit with us in the middle of it.
Help us see your power and goodness in both.
AMEN.

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

The Storm is not the problem

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

READ THIS

Jesus tells a story about two people who build houses. One builds on solid rock, and the other – apparently with an affinity for beach views – builds on sand.


It’s easy to skip to the end of the story and learn the lesson that we should build our lives on Christ. He is our solid foundation.

But don’t skip the storm.

Which house gets hit by a storm?

They both do.

Building on Christ doesn’t mean you won’t face the storms of life. However, it means they will not be your ultimate demise.

Storms are unwanted, destructive things. You didn’t ask for them. You don’t want them. But they hit you anyway.

Don’t confuse the presence of a storm with the absence of God.

Being in the midst of a storm doesn’t mean that God has abandoned you. In fact, it may be the thing that will show you how much he is with you.

DO THIS

What storm of life has taken away your contentment?
Either right now – or in the past.
Can you look at it through the eyes of faith to see how God was/is still with you in the midst of it?
Can you see how having God as your foundation is the way through it?

PRAY THIS

Father of constant, stable, unending love,
You are with us through everything.
The times we see you,
the times we doubt you are there,
the times we’re quite sure you’ve left.
Remind us of your presence.
Give us glimpses of your kindness.
Help us see you are there,
even when the storm threatens to block our view of you.
Amen.

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Slow down there…

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment – your weekly nudge towards a life of Biblical contentment.

Here are today’s three contentment-related things for you to

read | do | pray

REMEMBER…

You can still get a free copy of my soon-to-be-released book on the life of Peter simply by recommending Living Contentment to a friend.

…now….on to this week’s newsletter…

READ THIS

In contemporary society our Adversary majors in three things:
noise, hurry, and crowds.
If he can keep us engaged in “muchness” and “manyness,” he will rest satisfied.
Celebration of Discipline Richard Foster

Imagining things from our Adversary’s perspective is usually restricted to reading C.S. Lewis’s short classic Screwtape Letters. However, it’s probably a good posture to take every so often.

If we assume our Enemy wants us engaged in noise, hurry, and crowds – we can see what (at least from Richard Foster’s perspective) we should be paying attention to.

Quiet
Slowness
Solitude

Foster wrote Celebration of Discipline in the ’70s, and Lewis was writing just after WWII. But this is at the same time both an incredibly current and ancient attitude. For Augustine – a North African Christian leader nearly 1800 years ago – solitude was a necessity. Not just a nice-to-have add-on. Many pastors – like John Mark Comer and others today are urging us to take a step back, unplug, and just be. Not do anything other than be in God’s presence.

We can’t find contentment in life if we are so busy, rushed, and drowning in noise that we can’t even feel, see, or hear what God has for us.

DO THIS

Just slow down.

Take the next 30 minutes.
No?
how about 10?
Five?

Take a step back.
Unplug.
Stop doing.

Rest in God’s presence.
No doing – just being.

If our enemy truly does want us to be swamped with noise, hurry, and crowds – get away from them. Even if just for a moment.

Breathe in – breathe out. Recognize that you sit in the presence of Almighty God.

PRAY THIS

God of Sabbath,
Lord of the Still Small Voice,
Father of gentleness.
Help us to respect our limitations.
Help us see when we need to slow down.
When we need to stop.
When we need to hit pause.
Help us hear your voice,
Feel your presence,
and know your love
in the quiet, stillness of our soul.

AMEN

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

Holding Grief & Joy Together + Book List #2

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment Weekly. Here are your three contentment-related thoughts for today. Something for you to: read | do | pray

READ THIS

One of the hardest things about grief – is that it can feel all-encompassing. Mourning the loss of someone or something significant can feel all-consuming. However – most of the time – we feel grief and joy.

We are absolutely wrecked that they are gone, but glad their suffering is over.
Devastated they moved away, but excited for their new adventure.
We are glad for a new opportunity, but overwhelmed at the same time

These things can, do, and often will – occur at the same time. Joy and sorrow, happiness and despair, excitement and worry.

If we think contentment means getting to the place where we are only experiencing positive feelings, we will be constantly disappointed.

We need to accept that life is not so binary, not so black OR white.

I hope one of the books below can help you see that truth at a deeper level

DO THIS

You’re “DO THIS” for this week is a bit different. I really encourage you to read/listen to one of the following five books. They are memoirs/autobiographies by people who have lived through experiences that have forced them to reject the false notion that things are either all good or all bad. That contentment can – and often does – lie in the grey areas of life.

In no particular order….

  1. All My Knotted up Life – Beth Moore
  2. I Am Restored: How I Lost My Religion but Found My Faith -Lecrae
  3. Let Justice Roll Down – John Perkins
  4. Me, Myself and Bob – Phil Vischer
  5. Everything Happens for a Reason – Kate Bowler

All My Knotted up Life: A Memoir – Beth Moore

“I’d held the dying hands of perfect strangers. But only strangers are perfect. It’s the known ones that muddle.”

So to be honest, although I’d heard of, and about Beth Moore for years, I’m pretty sure I’ve never read anything by her (which I guess is not surprising since she spent most of her career writing women’s Bible studies for the Southern Baptist church). But what a story she has. Through all kinds of hardships – some from others’ bad choices, others medical, others hurt from inside the church – Moore has a seemingly unflappable sense of contentment.

I Am Restored: How I Lost My Religion but Found My Faith – Lecrae

“I came to this painful realization: I wasn’t devoted to God. I was devoted to my devotion to God.”

Just listing this book makes me want to go back and read it again. This is an unflinching and brutally honest look from a life that has known much suffering, hurt, success, acceptance, rejection, love, and everything in between. From a difficult childhood to trying to find a place in the modern evangelical church for himself, this story is powerful. For years I have found the lyrics of Lecrae’s music to be an incredible source of theology, and this book lets his life story fill in the gaps.

Let Justice Roll Down – John M. Perkins

“Yielding to God’s will can be hard. And sometimes, it really hurts. But it always brings peace.”

This one is actually a bit tough as it goes head-first into some pretty tough realities of the near past. Someone who has experienced so much hurt, hatred, contempt, anger, and injustice you would understand (and probably expect) to be bitter, jaded, and angry. Dr. Perkins instead tells a story of forgiveness, restoration, and grace. He found ways to rest in the contentment of his faith no matter what this world was putting him through.

Me, Myself and Bob: A True Story About Dreams, God, and Talking Vegetables – Phil Vischer

“The Christian life wasn’t about running like a maniac; it was about walking with God. It wasn’t about impact; it was about obedience. “

This book is funny, poignant, and so insightful. It is a great read about how faith intersects with business and entrepreneurship ( years ago I used it as an assigned text in a university business class I taught) But the real lesson comes through when we see how someone can stand firm despite seeming to lose it all. Especially when the dream/calling is what you honestly think God wanted you to do. Vischer realizes that maybe working for God, and resting in God are not the same. We will run ourselves ragged working for him, but find contentment resting in Him.

Everything Happens for a Reason and Other Lies I’ve Loved – Kate Bowler

“At a time when I should have felt abandoned by God, I was not reduced to ashes. I felt like I was floating, floating on the love and prayers of all those who hummed around me like worker bees, bringing notes and flowers and warm socks and quilts embroidered with words of encouragement. They came in like priests and mirrored back to me the face of Jesus.”

What happens when a Manitoba Mennonite, grows up, earns their PhD, studies the American Prosperity gospel, marries their high-school sweetheart, gets their dream job, and has a baby….. only to be diagnosed with terminal cancer at 35? This book. With what – at least to me – can only be a humble, but quirky Canadian-prairie sense of humour Kate Bowler pulls us along for an incredibly personal look at what you are left with when you think you are literally about to lose everything. The answer is contentment through faith. This is a great book.

PRAY THIS

Lord, may we learn from your saints,
others who have lived before us.
Mothers, sons, pastors, writers, professors, janitors, neighbors.
Those who live out a contented life because you are the center of it.
may we learn from those who live out their faith.
Give us eyes to see the beauty of a deeply, truly contented life.
Even the ones right around us.

Amen

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George

PS: Remember… if you share this newsletter with someone using this link… [RH_REFLINK GOES HERE]

As soon as someone signs up I’ll send you a free copy of my soon-to-be-released book on Peter

You should be thankful….

Hi Reader,

Welcome to Living Contentment Weekly. Here are your three contentment-related thoughts for today. Something for you to: read | do | pray

READ THIS

Quite a few times here at Living Contentment we’ve looked at the relation between gratitude and contentment. Today i heard a quote that made the connection between them a bit clearer – at least for me.

Instead of adapting to goodness… celebrate goodness

— Robert A. Emmons and Jeremy Adam Smith

The Gratitude Project

Many times we desperately hope for something – and then we get it….and merely adapt to it.

The thing we thought was going to be life changing – is now normal.

The house that was going to make it all better – now is just fine.

The job that was going to be fulfilling – is now status quo.

The ….whatever. We adapted to it. We took it into our lives – made it somehow normal, and just move on.

We can easily adapt to something …but when we do so – we may be missing an opportunity to be thankful. To be grateful.

DO THIS

What thing do you have now – that you had hoped/anticipated / thought was going to be a game-changer?

Another way of thinking of it is What do you have now that is an answer to a prayer you had in the past?

Have you taken a miraculous answer to prayer – and somehow made it just part of life.

Don’t allow yourself to just adjust to goodness—remember it and celebrate it.

PRAY THIS

God give me eyes to see the goodness right in front of me.
Give me a mind to recall the things I asked you for.
Give me a heart to appreciate the goodness you have for me.
Amen

Talk to you next Thursday!

~George